38 Best Book Deals for 5/20/20: Big Little Lies, The Library Book, The Proposal and more

As of this posting, all of these deals are active, but I don’t know for how long!
Less than $1

The Seventh Sun by Lani Forbes

The Angel Experiment (Maximum Ride #1) by James Patterson

Less than $2

A Shadow Bright and Burning by Jessica Cluess

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Storm and Fury by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

No Judgments by Meg Cabot

A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James

And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

The Beholder by Anna Bright

The Tiger at Midnight by Swati Teerdhala

Watch Us Rise by Renee Watson & Ellen Hagan

The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials #1) by Philip Pullman

Final Girls by Riley Sager

The Proposal by Jasmine Guillory

My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, & Jodi Meadows

The Magicians by Lev Grossman

How To Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

Less than $3

Rebel by Marie Lu

The Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim

A History of Glitter and Blood by Hannah Moskowitz

The Library Book by Susan Orlean

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

Bloodleaf by Crystal Smith

The Shape of Water by Guillermo del Toro & Daniel Kraus

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez

The Brightsiders by Jen Wilde

Florida by Lauren Groff

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep

Uprooted by Naomi Novik


Recommended from this post:

Non-fiction Mini-Reviews

Since starting my new job at the library, I’ve begun reading more and more outside of my usual YA books (it’s just so hard to say “No” to books when I’m surrounded by them all day). I’ve even been reading non-fiction! Here are some short reviews for a couple of the non-fiction books I’ve been reading lately.

35901186The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson
This book was fantastic! I originally heard Kirk’s episode about the Tring heist on This American Life. I was worried the book would be repetitive since I already knew the gist of the story, but it has a ton of additional information (as promised).

I’m not sure if this is the author’s intent, but I really just feel so mad at the fly-tying community and at Rist. There’s just very little remorse to be found and a wild disregard for what these birds really mean on a scientific (and just basic human ethics) level.

Overall, I found this to be a quick read especially for a non-fiction book. It’s a quirky true crime story that I think a lot of people will find fascinating. What’s true? What’s a lie? And where are the rest of those bird skins??? 4/5

We Were Eight Years in PowerWe Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates
While I may not agree with all his points, I appreciate Coates’ writing and apparent passion. It feels trite to say, but this topic obviously means a lot to him, and that comes through with every single word in every single essay. He’s asking hard questions–questions that may not have a satisfying answer. And while he accepts that fact, he still feels that those questions need to be asked, and I agree.

I only have a couple of criticisms. The first is that his writing was hard for me to absorb at times. The language he chooses and the way he strings sentences together didn’t always translate in my head. That being said, I still could get the gist of what he was saying, but the lyricalness of his writing was sometimes lost on me.

The second is that as a POC who is not black, I felt a little bit like a third party reading this book. The focus of his essays is on black vs white relations in the United States. At times, it felt like Coates had blinders on to any other race that might exist in America. While I understand why his viewpoint here is so narrow, it made me feel a bit like an outsider while reading. He just kept talking about what this group of people did to this other group of people without mentioning where MY group of people fit in. 4/5