18 Best Book Deals for 8/28/19: Truly Devious, The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, These Rebel Waves, and more

As of this posting, all of these deals are active, but I don’t know for how long!
Less than $2

Sabriel by Garth Nix

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

One Hundred Names by Cecilia Ahern

Deerskin by Robin McKinley

You Were Here by Cori McCarthy

An American Princess: The Many Lives of Allene Tew by Annejet van der Zijl

The Murmur of Bees by Sofía Segovia

The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani

These Rebel Waves by Sara Raasch

Less than $3

The Kiss of Deception by Mary E Pearson

Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter

Not Even Bones by Rebecca Schaeffer

The Last Summer of the Garrett Girls by Jessica Spotswood

Small Spaces by Katherine Arden

Renegades by Marissa Meyer

Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson

Less than $4

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R King


Recommended from this post:

BOOK TAG: Books I WANT to read, but don’t want to READ

Book Tags

Jami over at Jamishelves created and posted this tag a couple weeks ago. I’m not usually a book tag kind of blogger, but this one seemed really fun! So even though I wasn’t tagged, I’m doing it anyway!

Rules:

  • Link back to the original tag (@Jamishelves)
  • Complete the questions with books you want to have read but don’t want to read
  • Tag some people at the end to do the tag next

1: A book that you feel you need to read because everyone talks about it

  • The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton

This is a book that has just never appealed to me for whatever reason. I keep hearing great things about it and about the sequel, but I’m just not into the premise!

The Belles

2: A book that’s really long

  • Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke

This baby is over 1,000 pages. I repeat, OVER 1,000 PAGES. That’s literally like three normal sized books combined.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

3: A book you’ve owned / had on your TBR for too long

  • The Beauty of Darkness by Mary E Pearson

I asked for this book for Christmas the year it came out (which I guess wasn’t that long ago, but it feels really long ago). I’d read the first two and couldn’t remember much. So I told myself I would wait to read this one until I’d reread the first two and now…it’s just been sitting on my shelf.

The Beauty of Darkness

4: A book that is ‘required’ reading
(eg, school text, really popular classic – something you feel obligated to read!)

  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

The old answer for this was Wuthering Heights, but I finally read that last year (the year before?). Spoiler: not worth it, imo. But this one I’m a little more excited for because I really liked My Plain Jane.

Jane Eyre

5: A book that intimidates you

  • The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling (reread)

This is a bit of a cheat, but I have been meaning to reread the Harry Potter books forever. I read them as they were coming out and I’ve attempted rereads since (most notably when I got my wisdom teeth out) but I can never seem to get past the fourth book! It’s just such a commitment and the books just get longer.

harry potter series

6: A book that you think might be slow

  • The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden

Apparently, I really liked the first two books, but at this point I can’t remember why? I remember the books are slow reads (for me at least) even though they contain some action. I’m just worried this book will be slow and I don’t have the motivation to pick it up.

The Winter of the Witch

7: A book you need to be in the right mood for

  • Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray

While I liked the first book (The Diviners), it was long and had a lot of loose ends. It was obviously setting things up for the rest of the series, so I feel like I’m really going to need to be in the right mood to finish.

Lair of Dreams

8: A book you’re unsure if you will like

  • Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

Another book that I’ve only heard good things about, but I have a thing about zombies. I. DO. NOT. LIKE. ZOMBIES. Especially on TV/in movies, but also in books. But like the rest of the premise sounds really good, and like I said, everyone’s been RAVING about it (it has a freaking 4.17 rating on Goodreads).

Dread Nation

I tag:
Deanna @A Novel Glimpse
Book Beach Bunny
Margaret @ Weird Zeal
Ashley @ Socially Awkward Bookworm
Kristin @ Kristin Kraves Books
Kaeley @ Spoilers May Apply

Here’s the list of prompts without my answers for your copying and pasting pleasure:

1: A book that you feel you need to read because everyone talks about it
2: A book that’s really long
3: A book you’ve owned / had on your TBR for too long
4: A book that is ‘required’ reading
(eg, school text, really popular classic – something you feel obligated to read!)
5: A book that intimidates you
6: A book that you think might be slow
7: A book you need to be in the right mood for
8: A book you’re unsure if you will like

Revisiting the Russian Fairytale | The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden [ARC]

This is the second book in the Winternight Trilogy. To see my review of the first book, please click here.

The Girl in the TowerAfter the events of the first book, Vasya knows that she can’t stay in her small town. She bridles her horse, Solovey, and takes off to finally have the adventure that she’s always longed for. Soon after, she discovers a village that’s been burned to the ground. Many of the villagers are dead and some have had their daughters taken. Vasya can find no trace of these bandits but doesn’t let that stop her. As she continues on her journey, she’ll find herself embroiled in Moscow politics and longing for a life that she may never be able to have.

This was a great follow-up to the The Bear and the Nightingale. It was very much in the same tone and the characters were just as real and complex as they were before (if not more so). Vasya isn’t always the most likable character, but she does make sense. She lives in a different time where women were just expected to stay in their towers all day, every day. Instead, Vasya longs for adventure and the reader can feel that throughout the book. She’s so conflicted because she doesn’t like lying by pretending to be a boy, but she knows that she wouldn’t be as helpful (or happy) if everyone knew she was a girl.

As far as other characters go, we get to know Morozko, Sasha, and Olga a lot better than we did in the first book in addition to new characters like Dimitrii and Olga’s daughter. This gives the reader a really diverse and interesting cast of secondary characters to get to know. I, personally, was not in favor of the priest from her hometown coming back. He’s just so…creepy. But I guess that’s the point.

The plot is slow-moving, but not boring by any means. I didn’t necessarily feel compelled to pick the book back up after I was done reading for the day, but I think that says more about my own reading preferences than the book itself. Arden is a talented writer and that shows through in this book just as it did in the first one. There’s the smallest little bud of a romance that blossoms in this book. I’ll be honest, I was wanting this romance from the first book, so I’m glad it’s getting explored and I hope we see more of it in the third book.

If you’re interested in historical Russia, Russian fairytales, or just love beautifully written (albeit slow-moving) books, then I would definitely recommend this book. I look forward to seeing what Arden comes out with next.

Overall Rating: 4
Language: None
Violence: Heavy, but not SUPER descriptive
Smoking/Drinking: Moderate
Sexual Content: Moderate

Note: I received this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Russian Fairy Tales Come to Life | The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden [ARC]

The Bear and the NightingaleVasya was born on a windy night to a dying mother who knew that Vasya was going to be someone special. As Vasya grows and becomes more and more wild, her father starts to worry that she needs a motherly influence. So he goes to Moscow and brings back a bride whose sanity may be a little questionable as she claims to see demons where others see nothing. While learning how to live with her new step-mother, Vasya continues to develop into a striking young woman who may have inherited a little bit of her grandmother’s magic.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I thought the writing was beautiful and I was very interested to learn about Russian mythology and fairy tales as that is an area that I know literally nothing about. I’ve always been a fan of mythology and fairy tales in general, so it was just fun to hear some new stories. I thought the author did a great job of incorporating Russian culture and language into the overall story without ruining the flow. I did find myself wondering, however, whether this was supposed to be a complete alternate Russia/Russia-derivative (kind of like Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha-verse) or if it was simply a fantastical historical Russia. The author’s note at the end of the book cleared that question up, but it wasn’t really clear throughout the story and I found myself distracted in some parts.

I thought Vasya was a really compelling character. I loved how the author starts the book with Vasya’s birth and we get to follow her into her teenage years. It really allows the reader to watch the character develop and helps us to understand who she is and what her motivations are. I also thought Vasya stayed really true to who she was supposed to be as a character throughout. Sometimes I’ve found that characters do things that don’t really make sense with who they are supposed to be, but I thought Vasya was a great example of somebody who just made sense as a character. She was so complex and conflicted throughout the book. As a reader, I felt that I could really empathize with what she was going through. Vasya tries to be the good Russian girl that she’s supposed to be, but at the same time her heart is leading her in a completely separate direction. Just…a really good character. I also loved the cast of secondary characters that Arden gives us. The familial relationships that exist between Vasya and her brothers and her younger step-sister felt so genuine.

The plot itself was a little slow-moving. It required a lot of setup, but I didn’t really find that I minded. The world that the author paints for us is so beautiful and filled with an ordinary (but at the same time not ordinary) magic. That being said, nothing much really happens until the last 25% of the book and then I felt that the ending was a bit abrupt.

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes well-developed characters or who is interested in a historical picture of Russia. Just from a quick scan of Goodreads, it looks like this book is the author’s debut novel. I anticipate that we’ll be hearing a lot more from her in the future.

Overall: 4
Language: None
Violence: Moderate
Smoking/Drinking: Moderate
Sexual Content: Mild

Note: I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.