Enter John Ambrose

Late this last week, Netflix made the announcement of who would be playing John Ambrose McClaren in the second To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before movie. Spoiler: It isn’t the guy from the end of the last movie. How would it feel to be that guy? Geez. I wasn’t a huge fan of that guy’s look in the first place, but I still feel bad for him.

Anyway, John Ambrose will be played by…drumroll…Jordan Fisher!

11633250-6865605-image-m-199_15538868887244917332711594932967.jpg

So there we go. I’ve been a fan of Jordan Fisher since his Teen Beach Movie days, but especially after Grease Live. I’m actually super excited about this casting and I continue to be, as ever, #teamJohnAmbrose. We welcome any and all new recruits.

How do you guys feel about this casting announcement? Are there any other actors you had in mind for John Ambrose?
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March Wrap-up & TBR Update

YOU GUYS. I had such a good reading month! I’m blown away by how much I was able to read. Not only did I complete my entire TBR (which never happens) but I read other books in addition! Now, a lot of these were graphic novels which read much quicker, but even with all of those, this has still been my biggest reading month for a while!

monthly tbr

Also read/reading:

*I didn’t review each of the Lumberjanes volumes individually, instead, I wrote this Lumberjanes overview.

Books finished this month: 20 (11 graphic novels)
Books currently reading: 3

Overall TBR:

TBR at the beginning of the year = 383
TBR at the beginning of March = 444
Books added to TBR = 23
Books read/deleted from TBR = 18
Total on TBR now = 449

How did your reading go this month?

18 Best Book Deals for 3/30/19: The Rosie Project, Dune, Odd & True, and more

As of this posting, all of these deals are active, but I don’t know for how long!
Free

Reap by Casey L Bond

Slave, Warrior, Queen by Morgan Rice

Less than $2

Just an Ordinary Day: Stories by Shirley Jackson

Confessions of an Art Addict by Peggy Guggenheim

Odd & True by Cat Winters

How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child by Sandra Uwiringiyimana

Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie (Hercule Poirot #23)

A Long Way Home: A Memoir by Saroo Brierley (adapted into the movie Lion)

Notorious RBG Young Readers’ Edition: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik

Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl

Dune by Frank Herbert

A Widow’s Story: A Memoir by Joyce Carol Oates

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

Talon by Julie Kagawa

Less than $3

Arrival (Stories of Your Life MTI) by Ted Chiang (adapted into the movie Arrival)

Maybe Not: A Novella by Colleen Hoover

I Remember Nothing by Nora Ephron

Less than $4

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion


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Top 10 finished series | Binge away!

Who else loves a good series binge??? One of my favorite things to do is to jump immediately from one book to the next in a series. No waiting, no forgetting who characters are or what happened to them. Just reading. So here are some of my favorite series that you can just BINGE.

Binge-able Series

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater

The Raven Boys; The Dream Thieves; Blue Lily, Lily Blue; The Raven King

Why I loved it: Great characters, magic, treasure/scavenger hunt, deliciously evil antagonists

Wolf by Wolf duology by Ryan Graudin

Wolf by Wolf; Blood for Blood

Why I loved it: Motorcycle race!, alternate history, STRONG female lead

The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

Cinder; Scarlet; Cress; Winter

Why I loved it: Strong women in typically “male occupations”, swoony romances, sassy robots, fairytale retellings

Crazy Rich Asians trilogy by Kevin Kwan

Crazy Rich Asians; China Rich Girlfriend; Rich People Problems

Why I loved it: SO MUCH DRAMA, some really likable characters, the food descriptions, depictions of extremely extravagant lifestyles

Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy by Laini Taylor

Daughter of Smoke & Bone; Days of Blood & Starlight; Dreams of Gods & Monsters

Why I loved it: Fascinating magic concept, fantastic world building, star-crossed lovers, beautiful writing, EVIL VILLAIN

Inkworld trilogy Cornelia Funke

Inkheart; Inkspell; Inkdeath

Why I loved it: Super readable, great characters, watching Maggie grow up

Six of Crows duology by Leigh Bardugo

Six of Crows; Crooked Kingdom

Why I loved it: Heists!, complicated relationships, great friendships, worldbuilding

Finishing School series by Gail Carriger

Etiquette & Espionage; Curtsies & Conspiracies; Waistcoats & Weaponry; Manners & Mutiny

Why I loved it: Great group of girlfriends, secret floating spy school, Sooties and Picklemen

The Madman’s Daughter trilogy by Megan Shepherd

The Madman’s Daughter; Her Dark Curiosity; A Cold Legacy

Why I loved it: Science-minded female protag, gothic classic retellings

Monsters of Verity duology by Victoria Schwab

This Savage Song; Our Dark Duet

Why I loved it: Monsters, broody violin player, tough-as-nails female protag, not-so-happy ending

What are some of your favorite finished series? Let me know which ones I should binge in the comments!

True Crime + LA + Libraries = Heart Eyes | The Library Book by Susan Orlean

The Library BookOn April 28, 1986 there was a huge fire at the LA Public Library. While this was obviously a big deal, the news got lost as Chernobyl happened the same day. When Susan Orlean moved to LA with her husband and son, she discovered this largely untold story and started doing some investigating. This book details the history of the LA Public Library, the fire itself, and the arson investigation that took place afterwards. Woven throughout that narrative is Orlean’s love letter to libraries themselves.

TL;DR – Orlean seamlessly intertwines several narratives. LA history, arson investigations, and the day-to-day of public libraries are all presented as equally fascinating.

eBook | Hardcover

First, let me say for anyone thinking about purchasing this book, it is GORGEOUS. Definitely bookstagrammable. However, if you decide to get the hardcover on Amazon (link above) just be warned that it does come with that “Reese’s book club” stamp (eye roll) which is not removable. If you would like an unmarred copy, I’d suggest getting a copy in person and B&N or something.

On to my review. My love affair with non-fiction continues! My husband helped me to discover recently that I’ve really been enjoying non-fiction books written by journalists (see Malcolm Gladwell, Michael Lewis, and recently Kirk Wallace Johnson). Susan Orlean was a journalist for the New York Times before writing this book so she fits right in my wheelhouse. Plus libraries, so it was always going to be a slam dunk.

This story is actually so fascinating, but the parts I loved most about this book were the descriptions of the day-to-day life of the library. At the very beginning when she’s writing about the library opening for the day, I legitimately got chills. I loved seeing all the different departments from her perspective and I could definitely relate to some of the stories.

I also really liked how she opened each chapter with some catalog listings that fit what the chapter was going to be about. I just thought it was a really nice touch and I liked guessing what kind of stuff was going to be in each chapter.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this book. If you love libraries, read this book. If you love true crime, read this book. If you love LA, read this book.

Overall Rating: 5
Language: Moderate
Violence: Mild
Smoking/Drinking: Mild
Sexual Content: Mild

31 Best Book Deals for 3/25/19: Geekerella, What If It’s Us, 99 Percent Mine, and more

You guys, there are SO MANY DEALS today!

As of this posting, all of these deals are active, but I don’t know for how long!
Free

Miss Mabel’s School for Girls by Katie Cross

Less than $1

Blackmail Boyfriend by Chris Cannon

Brave Leadership: Unleash Your Most Confident, Powerful, and Authentic Self to Get the Results You Need by Kimberly Davis

Less than $2

Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok

The Girl with the Red Balloon by Katherine Locke

Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man’s Fundamentals for Delicious Living by Nick Offerman

Geekerella by Ashley Poston

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Maledicte by Lane Robins

Seveneves by Neal Stephenson

March by Geraldine Brooks

Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge

Alex, Approximately by Jenn Bennett

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures foreword by Carla Hayden

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh by Michael Chabon

The Locksmith’s Daughter by Karen Brooks

Less than $3

Matched by Ally Condie

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne

Because I Was a Girl: True Stories for Girls of All Ages edited by Melissa de la Cruz

The Madman’s Daughter by Megan Shepherd

The Wicker King by K. Ancrum

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera

Furyborn by Claire Legrand

Less than $4

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

Hopeless by Colleen Hoover

The Luxe by Anna Godbersen

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova

The Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg

Angelfall by Susan Ee


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Bemused vs Amused: Do you know the difference?

discussion posts

This is such a huge pet peeve of mine. Authors use the word “bemused” when they really mean “amused” all. the. TIME. Let’s review definitions, shall we?

amused definition

bemused definition

 

 

 

 

I read a book recently where the author used the word bemused TWICE. Now, I’ll say giving the author the benefit of the doubt, bemused could hypothetically have fit the situation. However, in the context of the story, amused would have made much more sense. And here I am, as a reader, wondering how nobody knows the difference between these two words! Not the author, not the editor, not anyone else who read this book before it got published.

But to be completely transparent with you, when I looked up bemused on Dictionary.com, this is something else that popped up:

The verb bemuse (usually as the adjective bemused)is similar in sound to amuse, and has in fact taken on the meaning “to cause to be mildly amused.” Many usage experts and traditionalists consider this a misuse of bemuse, pointing out that its proper meaning is “to bewilder or confuse.” However, the history and use of bemuse has shown that is meaning is often ambiguous. It’s often the case that one’s feelings are a combination of bewilderment and amusement: Their customs bemuse most Americans. Even when it clearly means “to bewilder or confuse,” bemuse usually retains a lighthearted tone: one would not typically say: I was bemused by his motive for the murder.

So apparently, because everyone keeps using this word wrong, it’s starting to mean what everyone has been using it to mean. Isn’t that weird? It’s just so…frustrating to me, because it’s wrong! Just because people keep getting a math answer wrong doesn’t change what the answer actually is, right?

I was telling my husband about this strange phenomenon and he told me that the same thing happens with travesty vs tragedy. A lot of people use the word travesty to mean an even bigger tragedy, when in reality it means: “a false, absurd, or distorted representation of something.”

Anyway, there’s my rant for the day. Are there any words that you’ve noticed authors (or other people) consistently get wrong? Why do you think editors don’t catch that kind of thing?